Moneycontrol Be a Pro
Get App
Last Updated : Sep 03, 2019 06:15 PM IST | Source: PTI

Air pollution may reduce effectiveness of antibiotics: Study


Air pollution may increase the potential of bacteria to cause respiratory infections by reducing the effectiveness of antibiotic treatment, scientists have found for the first time.

The study by researchers at the University of Leicester in the UK has important implications for the treatment of infectious diseases, which are known to be increased in areas with high levels of air pollution.

They looked into how air pollution affects the bacteria living in our bodies, specifically the respiratory tract - the nose, throat and lungs.

Close

A major component of air pollution is black carbon, which is produced through the burning of fossil fuels such as diesel, biofuels and biomass.

The research shows that this pollutant changes the way in which bacteria grow and form communities, which could affect how they survive on the lining of our respiratory tracts and how well they are able to hide from, and combat, our immune systems.

"This work increases our understanding of how air pollution affects human health," said Julie Morrissey, Associate Professor at Leicester." It shows that the bacteria which cause respiratory infections are affected by air pollution, possibly increasing the risk of infection and the effectiveness of antibiotic treatment of these illnesses," said Morrissey.

"It shows that the bacteria which cause respiratory infections are affected by air pollution, possibly increasing the risk of infection and the effectiveness of antibiotic treatment of these illnesses," said Morrissey.

"Our research could initiate an entirely new understanding of how air pollution affects human health. It will lead to enhancement of research to understand how air pollution leads to severe respiratory problems and perturbs the environmental cycles essential for life," Morrissey said.

"Everybody worldwide is exposed to air pollution every time they breathe," Shane Hussey and Jo Purves, research associates working on the project said.

"It is something we cannot limit our exposure to as individuals, but we know that it can make us ill. So we need to understand what it is doing to us, how it is making us unhealthy, and how we might be able to stop these effects," they said.

The research focused on two human pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae, which are both major causes of respiratory diseases and exhibit high levels of resistance to antibiotics.

The team found that black carbon alters the antibiotic tolerance of Staphylococcus aureus communities and importantly increases the resistance of communities of Streptococcus pneumoniae to penicillin, the front line treatment of bacterial pneumonia. It was also found that black carbon caused Streptococcus.

It was also found that black carbon caused Streptococcus pneumoniae to spread from the nose to the lower respiratory tract, which is a key step in development of disease.

The study was published in the journal Environmental

Microbiology.

[blurb]

Investors are also focused on when the Federal Reserve is likely to next raise interest rates as a plethora of Federal Reserve officials deliver speeches this week, culminating in an address by Fed Chair Janet Yellen on Friday.[/blurb]

[quote]Asia markets were mostly higher today, shrugging off modest US losses from Tuesday, as traders focused on President Donald Trump's address to the US Congress.
[/quote]

  • list-1

  • list-2

  • list-3


Get access to India's fastest growing financial subscriptions service Moneycontrol Pro for as little as Rs 599 for first year. Use the code "GETPRO". Moneycontrol Pro offers you all the information you need for wealth creation including actionable investment ideas, independent research and insights & analysis For more information, check out the Moneycontrol website or mobile app.
First Published on Mar 3, 2017 03:26 pm
Loading...
Sections
Follow us on
Available On
PCI DSS Compliant